Local egg farmer “Gets Cracking” with Tim Hortons


  • Feature   Wed, Jul 21st, 2021   Gary West
Julie Wynette with sons Reid and Nash, gathering farm fresh eggs, with Tim Hortons film crew at their egg barn. Photos contributed by Gary West


Julie Wynette with sons Reid and Nash, gathering farm fresh eggs, with Tim Hortons film crew at their egg barn. Photos contributed by Gary West


If you’ve been watching Tim Hortons commercials on TV lately, you might have noticed a local face whose family has been known for producing eggs in the Tavistock area for three generations now.
Julie Wynette (Brenneman) was approached by Tim Hortons when they were looking to promote their “freshly cracked egg” in their new breakfast sandwich. They wanted to showcase a young egg farm family, typical of the consumers who would be ordering a breakfast sandwich.
Julie would be the first to tell you that she was a little apprehensive initially. Still, once they got into the actual production, she felt it was really going to be a great thing for egg farmers and consumers right across the country to promote a healthy wholesome food in the drive-thru area of Tim Hortons. The commercials will be shown in Canada from coast to coast, and Julie feels privileged to have been asked to participate.
Eggs and farming have always been in her blood; she was raised on a farm on the 11th Line of East-Zorra Township on the western edge of Tavistock in Perth County. Julie is the daughter of Keith and Marilyn Brenneman, (along with her two sisters Pam, and her husband Owen, who are broiler chicken farmers South of Tavistock. Her other sister is Chris and her husband Burton Hartmann, residents of north Vancouver in British Columbia).
Julie and her husband Kyle, whose two sons Nash and Reid, also appear in the commercial, are big helpers gathering eggs and helping with chores on the farm. Julie says that Kyle, who also works for Maple Leaf poultry out of New Hamburg, is kept busy managing 8 acres of hops, a product used to brew local micro craft beers.
During production of the commercial, Julie says it took one full day of filming at their egg barn and at the local Tim’s store, which had to be completely shut down to customers for two days for the film crew to get set up and film. She smiles when she says all that time for a 15, 30, or 45 second spot on T.V.
There were 20 crew members at the farm and the store, and 30 back at their head studio in Toronto, on Zoom, giving suggestions on how they wanted the project to proceed. Egg Farmers of Ontario Staff were also on hand to offer guidance when the crew, all from the big city of Toronto, needed advice on the do’s and don’ts of life on an egg farm.
Julie said, in summary, that it was a great honour to be the voice and face representing Canadian egg farmers across the country. She agrees that with a well-known brand like Tim Hortons, promoting farm fresh eggs, the future of their Grade” A” egg breakfast should be here for many years to come.